Monday, June 14, 2010

Sometimes it *is* a conspiracy

I am the guy that is generally annoyed by unsubstantiated conspiracy theories from the political left and the right about things that supposedly the other side did. Conspiracies are hard to pull off because they generally involve, well, people conspiring. That means talking. And big conspiracies require *more* people conspiring. And making sure people STFU is hard. There is always someone who can't keep their mouth shut. That is why big conspiracies have a hard time surviving, particularly in the Internet age.

But sometimes conspiracies get pulled off. At least for a while. That doesn't mean that big conspiracies can ultimately be kept secret forever, but sometimes they can be kept quiet long enough for the dirty deed to get done.

And this is what I fear has happened in South Carolina.

Last Tuesday Alvin Greene won the South Carolina democratic nomination for senate.


  • Mr. Greene is unemployed, but managed to come up with the $10,400 South Carolina filing fee.
  • Mr. Greene currently being prosecuted for a felony obscenity charge.
  • Mr. Greene did no campaigning. None.
  • Mr. Greene got no press coverage before winning. None.
  • Mr. Greene raised no money. None.
  • Mr. Greene had no campaign staff or workers. None.
  • Mr. Greene has a hard time completing sentences.
  • Mr. Greene is a black man in a state that, lets just say, isn't the most racially open minded state in the country.
  • Mr. Greene got 60% of the democratic primary vote, *whipping* the leading candidate, a well known former judge and state legislator.


If you think this adds up, I have some BP shares I'd like to sell you.

12 comments:

  1. It's a big mistake to assume that conspiracies not only have to remain secret, but will fail when brought to light. Some of the most dangerous conspiracies in history were done with a devil-may-care attitude toward the public finding out. For example, the European Union just celebrated its "50th anniversary" a few years ago. "Officially," the EU is less than 20 years old.

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  2. I am really only taking about the kind of conspiracies that have to remain secret. If they dont have to remain secret its really just a plan.

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  3. **To clarify that point...

    It's very rare to find a bunch of villains sitting around, twirling their moustaches in a dimly lit room, carving up a map with a knife. Every loss of liberty or sovereignty and every cooked election almost invariably are open secrets.

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  4. for example, if it comes to light here that there was election fraud, the conspiracy will not have worked. If it could come out into to the public that this was some kind of illegal act, then it would be a failed conspiracy since exposure by definition causes the act to fail... presuming it comes out before the election.

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  5. What happens if it comes out that the local good old boys in the local Democratic Party called up a few activist groups to show up at the polls and overpower a candidate they didn't want to win? Both party establishments do that.

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  6. Then by my definition, thats not a conspiracy. Its just politics. YMMV.

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  7. "What happens if it comes out that the local good old boys in the local Democratic Party called up a few activist groups to show up at the polls and overpower a candidate they didn't want to win? Both party establishments do that."

    Which is pretty much what happened when David Duke tried running for governor of Louisiana. Both the national and local G.O.P. strongly hinted to the party faithful to either stay home or vote for the democrat.

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  8. @rglovejoy

    I understand why republicans wouldnt want David Duke to win, but why would the democrats conspire to guarantee Jim Demint (the current republican senator) to win. Answer... they wouldnt. If something is wrong here it is certainly not the democrats somehow rigging a statewide election to guarantee that they lose.

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  9. Love the blog, Hank.

    Could it be that Mr Greene won because he is the "other guy"? Was the other candidate known and controversial to Democrats? I don't know about the other candidates on the ballot, but Mr Greene's lack of reputation could have worked in his favor.

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  10. Thanks... cough, cough... Cornholio :)

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  11. Thanks for sharing this. I wouldn't have had any idea otherwise.

    Wow. Just wow.

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  12. What is the answer here??? How did he get elected??????

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